People are living longer lives and often remain physically able throughout the majority of their lifetime. However, mental degradation is becoming a more prominent issue, meaning that many older people suffer from mental conditions such as dementia. Dementia is one of the leading reasons why older people need to reside in nursing homes, and it makes them particularly vulnerable to abuse.

If you have recently taken the difficult decision to move your parent into a residential care unit, it is completely normal to have concerns. You may worry that they are confused about where they are, and you will hope that they adjust to the changes in a positive way. The majority of nursing home residents experience an increase in their quality of life as a result of the care they receive in nursing homes. However, others, unfortunately, experience abuse and neglect. The following are some things you can do to protect your parent from nursing home abuse.

Know the signs

There are many signs of nursing home abuse that are not easy to recognize if you are not familiar with them. For example, many people think that frequent bedsores are simply an unavoidable aspect of being in a nursing home. However, this is not necessarily the case. Bedsores can be prevented by changing positions and good hygiene. If your parent is suffering from severe bedsores, it’s probable that they are not receiving the care that they deserve.

Additionally, changes in behavior could be a sign of abuse. If your parent is suddenly feeling anxious, tense, depressed or withdrawn, it may be a sign that they are being verbally or physically abused.

Keep in regular contact

Make sure that you have frequent contact with your parent. This way, you can note down any changes in their health or behavior. This will help you to be able to take successful action if you do believe that abuse is occurring.

Take action when necessary

If you have a good reason to believe that your parent is being actively abused or neglected by nursing home employees, you should consider taking legal action. This can help to ensure that no other elderly person will have to suffer the same treatment, and damages may be also gained.